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Make this easy fermented garlic honey for kids with only two ingredients to combat those icky back to school colds and illnesses.

Having a jar of liquid gold AKA fermented garlic honey in your medicine cabinet will help you be more prepared for all of the incoming (and not-so-welcomed) sicknesses expected when the kids go back to school, and holidays roll around.

*Fermented garlic honey is not for babies under 12 months of age due to the inclusion of raw honey*

Fermented Garlic Honey Benefits

For generations, mothers have prepared fermented garlic honey due to its powerful properties to wage internal wars against cold and flu viruses, and other common cold weather ailments.

Fermented garlic honey actively fights infections, boosts your immune system, and can be used as a heavy metal detox. It’s a powerhouse for antibacterial, antiviral and anti-fungal medicinal properties. 

What You Will Need

Fermented garlic honey is so easy to make and requires no special equipment. You probably have everything you need right in your pantry.

  • Organic Garlic Bulbs
  • Organic Raw Honey
  • Clean Glass Jar and Lid
  • Knife
  • Cutting Board 
  • Damp Kitchen Towel

How to Make Fermented Garlic Honey

The fermentation process to make fermented garlic honey takes 3 to 4 weeks until it is ready for consumption so be sure to plan ahead and let’s begin!

Fermented foods have a very long shelf life so once you start using them, they will not go to waste. 

First, you will need a clean jar with a lid. Do yourself the favor and opt for a quart size or couple of pint sized jars.

Next, peel your garlic. Cut away any visible blemishes and do not use a clove if it is discolored, over ripened, or soft.

If you come across any mold, discard the moldy garlic clove, clean off your surface, utensils and wash your hands so there is no transfer into the jar. You want to use pearly white or ivory-colored, firm garlic cloves. 

Inflict Tissue Damage to Release the Allicin

Before filling the jar, it is important that we damage the garlic clove in order to release the allicin. Allicin is the chemical that gives garlic its antibacterial superpowers and is only activated when damage occurs to the raw garlic clove.

You can achieve this by cutting the garlic in half or thicker bulbs into thirds. When you come across the smaller thin bulbs, just score with a blade to create some grooves.

If the bulb is intact and undisturbed, there is no allicin present. Once the organosulfur compound allicin is disturbed the allicin is then released giving off garlic’s pungent smell and the properties that make this remedy so powerful. 

You will need enough garlic to fill your jar 2/3 of the way. Then slowly start pouring your honey. 

Let the bubbles come up and keep filling until you have covered all the cloves with a good inch of honey above the garlic.

Do not fill the jar up to the collar because as the fermentation process takes place, carbon dioxide gas will build and the mixture will bubble over. 

Put the lid on the jar, not overly tightened. Your jar of fermented garlic honey can be placed in a cool, dry cabinet free of sunlight.

How to Burp your Jar

Each day you will have to “burp” your jar. Burping your jar is simple. All you have to do is loosen the lid to let the gas out, then lightly tighten the lid.

Once the lid is secure, tip the jar upside down so that the honey is coating the cloves that were previously exposed towards the top and return the jar to the cabinet.

Pro tip: Set a daily reminder in your phone to never miss a burp.

How To Know When Fermented Garlic Honey is Ready for Use

After 3-4 weeks is complete, there are a few visible signs that your fermented garlic honey is ready for use:

  1. The color of the garlic has become golden and the texture softened.
  2. The honey is now loose and the flavor of the cloves is no longer spicy. It is also a culinary delight that it is used as a marinate for poultry and pork dishes.  

Can Fermented Garlic Honey Cause Botulism?

The concern of “will my fermented honey garlic end up containing botulism?” is a common one.

Honey can contain a bacteria called Clostridium Botulinum, which is why it should never be given to infants under 12 months of age.

Fermented garlic honey is absolutely safe if made correctly. Botulism cannot grow in a pH lower than 4.6 due to the acidity.

To keep your mind at ease, there are litmus test strip kits that can be used to test the pH level of your honey.  The pH level of honey ranges between 3.2 to 5.4. This number varies depending on which plants the bees use to make their honey.

How to Use Fermented Garlic Honey

Once you start to feel rundown, develop obvious cold or flu symptoms, brain fog and fatigued, you should start taking doses regularly until symptoms subside.

Here are some ways you might want to use Fermented Garlic Honey:

  • Take a teaspoon of the honey or eat a fermented garlic clove.
  • Add the honey to your tea
  • Drizzle over greens as a salad dressing
  • Drizzle over plain greek yogurt
  • Add into a Greens Smoothie

Repeat this until your symptoms are gone.

I promise this will not last long in your pantry! I hope this becomes an autumn/winter household staple in your home just like it is in ours.

More Home Remedies to Fight Cold & Flu Season

How to Make Pine Tea (Safe for Children)

Elderberry Syrup Recipe for Toddlers (Adult Dosing Included)

Natural DIY “Vicks Vapor Rub”

Fermented Garlic Honey

Fermented Garlic Honey

Yield: 1 Jar
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Additional Time: 28 days
Total Time: 28 days 30 minutes
Difficulty: Easy

Make this easy fermented garlic honey for kids with only two ingredients to combat those icky back to school colds and illnesses.

Materials

  • Organic Garlic Bulbs
  • Organic Raw Honey
  • Clean Glass Jar and Lid

Tools

  • Knife
  • Cutting Board 
  • Damp Kitchen Towel

Instructions

  1. Clean your jar and lid so that it is free from any dust or pathogens.
  2. Peel your garlic cloves. Cut away any visible blemishes and do not use a clove if it is discolored, over ripened, or soft.
  3. Cut the garlic cloves in half or thicker cloves into thirds to release the allicin. For smaller thin cloves, just score with a blade to create some grooves.
  4. Peel and cut enough garlic to fill your jar 2/3 of the way.
  5. Pour honey into the jar to fill 1" above the garlic. Leave at least 1" of headspace between the top of the honey and the jar collar.
  6. Tighten the jar so it's finger tight and store in a dark, cool place like a pantry for 4 weeks.
  7. Every day, "burp" the jar to release gases by slightly unscrewing the lid to let the air out. Lightly retighten and store.
  8. Alternate storing right-side up and upside down every other day to ensure all garlic cloves ferment evenly.

Notes

Fermented garlic honey is not for babies under 12 months of age due to the inclusion of raw honey.

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This information is intended for educational purposes only. The content created for www.naturalhomeapothecary.com has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Consult your healthcare provider for personal healthcare decision making guidance.

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